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  • Accessibility and autonomy in higher education

    Accessibility and autonomy in higher education

    By Sunaryo Kartadinata – Co-operation among Asia Pacific countries as manifested through Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) has made Asia Pacific a powerfully open region in the economic, political, social and cultural arenas. In particular, the higher education sector has attracted special attention due to new found openness. The concentration of the world’s population (more than 60 per cent) in Asia has resulted in enormous potential for competition in and demand for higher education that should be responded to by diversifying […]

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  • (R)evolution in higher education

    By Louis Coiffait – Are universities currently experiencing an unprecedented volume, velocity and variety of change? And if so how are they reacting now and how should they react in the future? What are the key transformations taking place and are they revolutionary or evolutionary? This editorial reflects on these broad questions through the lessons learned from the articles in this edition, as well as from others across the wider Blue Skies collection and beyond. In the first fifteen months of the project so far […]

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  • Seven predictions for technology-enabled higher education

    By Sarah Porter – The world has seen some unimaginable changes in the last fifty years – and technology of various kinds has been at the heart of much of this change. Technology is a tremendous advantage in some contexts – connecting people, curing illnesses, boosting food production and solving problems. At the same time, technology can also have negative impacts – and also unforeseen consequences. I believe that higher education is currently at something of a turning point in […]

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  • Putting students first

    By David Willetts –  Across the world, more people aspire to higher education. It is a growth sector in mature economies and developing countries. The evidence on the benefits of higher  education is overwhelming: it is good for individuals, good for the economy and good for society. That list helps answer the question of how to pay for it. It has to be a mixed model in which the direct beneficiaries contribute but others do too. Here in the UK the Dearing report and […]

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  • A private education in times of austerity?

    By Carl Lygo –  We are seeing a tremendous demand for quality university education worldwide but a serious lack of global supply, just as new technologies are improving access to such quality education. In 2000 it was estimated that globally there were 97.3 million students in higher education; by 2012 this had reached over 150 million and some predictions suggest there will be as many as 300 million students by 20251. It is amazing to think that by 2020, four countries will account for over 50% […]

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  • An economic necessity: putting postgraduates at the heart of the system

    An economic necessity: putting postgraduates at the heart of the system

    By Graham Spittle – Imagine what the standing of industry and education will be in a country like India by the second half of this century. How well-skilled will the population be? Will the plan to build hundreds of new universities have paid dividends? How attractive will Western conglomerates find the relatively low cost of labour? How many of the tech jobs once found in Cambridge, Frankfurt or San Jose will now be found in the business parks of Bangalore or Gurgaon? Will Britain’s role […]

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  • Universities and The Knowledge Age

    Universities and The Knowledge Age

    By David Docherty –   University and business relations have always ebbed and flowed. For the most part the relationship has been fruitful, creative and collaborative. On occasion, it’s been a dialogue between at best dysfunctional friends, at worst, warring tribes. But post the Browne Review we should take the opportunity for new and broader thinking about the role of universities in a knowledge-based economy. There are as many definitions of the knowledge economy as there are economists trying to […]

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  • A different horizon: higher education in South Africa

    A different horizon: higher education in South Africa

    By Fathima Dada – The latest available statistics from Higher Education South Africa (HESA) demonstrate that currently around 500,000 students are enrolled on a full-time basis at academic institutions across South Africa.  This includes full universities, comprehensive universities and universities of technology. Statistics from 2001 and 2009 respectively show a cumulative increase in enrolment, across these institutions, of around 140,000 (35 per cent), from a figure of 401,000 in 2001 to 541,000 in 2009. This figure does not include the […]

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  • The future of university rankings

    The future of university rankings

    By Phil Baty – Let us be frank. University rankings are crude. They simply cannot capture – let alone accurately measure – many of the things that matter most in higher education: how a great lecturer can transform the lives of their students for example, or how much free enquiry enhances our society. They can never be objective, because their indicators and methodologies are based on the subjective judgment of the compilers. At their worst, university rankings can impose uniformity […]

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