Home » Editions » 2012 Asia Pacific (Page 2)

  • The students of tomorrow

    The students of tomorrow

    By Rikiichi Koizumi – The growth of ICT such as the Internet has been accelerating the globalisation of societies in recent years. In cyberspace, there are no national, temporal or geographical borders. ‘Digital natives’, who were born at a time when the Internet was commonplace, live in two different societies: the ‘real society’ and the ‘virtual society’. Living in such an environment is perfectly normal and natural for them. However, for ‘digital immigrants’ like those of my generation, this two-tiered […]

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  • How Open Data, data literacy and Linked Data will revolutionise higher education

    By Derek McAuley, Hanif Rahemtulla, James Goulding and Catherine Souch – ‘Open Data’ refers to the philosophical and methodological approach to democratising data, enabling individuals, communities and organisations to access and create value through the reuse of non-sensitive, publicly available information. This data is typically available online at no cost to citizen groups, non-governmental-organisations (NGOs) and businesses. Some view this as the logical conclusion to Freedom of Information (FoI) Acts in various countries—if citizens can ask for the data, why […]

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  • The future of university rankings

    By Phil Baty – Let us be frank. University rankings are crude. They simply cannot capture—let alone accurately measure—many of the things that matter most in higher education: how a great lecturer can transform the lives of their students for example, or how much free enquiry enhances our society. They can never be objective, because their indicators and methodologies are based on the subjective judgment of the compilers. At their worst, university rankings can impose uniformity on a sector that […]

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  • Know-That, Know-How and Know-Why: The Unity of Knowledge

    Know-That, Know-How and Know-Why: The Unity of Knowledge

    By Brian Mooney – While there are ever new issues in addressing the future of education, there are some dimensions of education that remain perennial. While debates rage over whether a university (or even pre-tertiary) education ought to be liberal or foster growth in a globalised economy perhaps we should step back in order to re-focus on what all education involves.  In a recent book I proposed a tripartite distinction in respect to understanding teaching and learning. 1 I argued […]

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  • Learning for the future

    By Phil Race – It has long been recognised that learning happens by doing rather than by just being in the presence of someone more learned. For centuries, higher education educators’ roles centred on transmitting the content of precious books, articles and other resources in ways that learners could handle. Now, information is ubiquitous. Most learning resources are available to just about everyone online (often free) or through a plethora of information-handling channels. This necessitates transformed roles for educators, to […]

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  • The purpose and process of lifelong learning: all work and no play?

    By Ezri Carlebach – The term ‘lifelong learning’ has its modern origins in post World War I reconstruction efforts. In view of the extension of suffrage, and with at least one eye on the principles of the October Revolution in Russia, the Adult Education Committee of the Ministry of Reconstruction declared in 1919 that: ‘adult education… is a permanent national necessity, an inseparable aspect of citizenship, and therefore should be both universal and lifelong’. 1 The use of lifelong learning […]

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  • First class: how assessment can enhance student learning

    By Sally Brown – Too many universities pay insufficient attention to assessment: usually the mechanics are adequately managed, but the purposes and practices are less well thought-through, relying on ‘tried and tested’ approaches, which in reality are neither. ‘Nothing we do to, or for our students is more important than our assessment of their work and the feedback we give them on it. The results of our assessment influence students for the rest of their lives and careers.’1 Assessment in […]

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  • Education for employment and long term economic development in China

    Education for employment and long term economic development in China

    By Isa Wong – The focus of the debate around education system reform in China is increasingly concerned with how best to prepare students for the future, in turn continuing China’s economic development and increasing its international competitiveness. Higher education has a crucial role to play in this—it has to be relevant to today’s society and that of the future, ensuring that students are familiar with and proficient in using the tools and skills which they will be reliant on […]

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  • What is ‘higher’ about higher education?

    What is ‘higher’ about higher education?

    By Gavin Moodie – This short article answers Cleveland’s question ‘What is “higher” about higher education?’ 1 by distinguishing higher education from vocational education on the one hand and school education on the other. It argues that education varies by the extent to which its context is academic disciplines and the extent to which its context is outside education, most often work. Higher education is distinguished from vocational education by being more academic and less externally contextualised than vocational education. […]

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