Home » Editions » 2012 Asia Pacific (Page 2)

  • Innovation in higher education

    By Geoff Mulgan and Mary Abdo – For universities around the world these are both exhilarating and troubling times. Enrolment in tertiary education has risen beyond any expectations, to some 150m worldwide.1 A truly global industry has taken shape, with new technology enabling rapid collaboration and dissemination of ideas, and students increasingly matriculating at foreign institutions. Yet there is also disquiet. Much important knowledge creation takes place outside of higher education. Few institutions are rich or self-sustaining, and many face […]

    Continue reading »

  • How higher education can drive an enterprise revolution

    By Wendy Purcell and Caroline Chipperfield – Universities are places of discovery and innovation, as expressed through the two pillars of their activities; teaching and research. Around the world some universities are moving to view their academic endeavours through the lens of enterprise, further extending their so-called ‘third stream’ activity and embracing a wider cultural and social agenda. From this perspective, ‘being enterprising is the ability to respond to change, take risks, to innovate and to generate and implement new […]

    Continue reading »

  • Context: Higher education in Asia Pacific

    Context: Higher education in Asia Pacific

    By David Barnett – CEO Higher Education, Pearson Asia Pacific At a time when the eyes of the world are focused on the emergence of Asia (and China in particular) as global economic powers, higher education in the region is more important than ever. Developed economies rely on a flow of highly skilled labour to drive productivity, create more confident and affluent middle classes, and to increase business efficiency. Having a vibrant and high quality higher education system is widely accepted […]

    Continue reading »

  •  
  • Diversity in higher education and social mobility

    By Matt Grist and Julia Margo – Let us introduce you to Asa (not her real name). We met Asa at a Community College in London, England. Asa was a ‘learning advocate’, someone who represents the college to external visitors like us, and who observes lessons, carries out research and advocates on behalf of students to the college’s senior staff. Asa was a bright, focussed young woman. And she wanted to go to university. What she wanted to study was […]

    Continue reading »

  • From connectivity to next-generation learning

    From connectivity to next-generation learning

    By Chun-ming Leung – We can apply elements of network theory to identify increasing connectivity as a driving force behind recent developments in higher education. This will also help us to understand the different characteristics of next-generation learning. Connectivity and Learning We define the connectivity of a network as a measure of the extent to which its components are linked to one another, and of the ease with which the individual components can interact with each other. Since learning generally […]

    Continue reading »

  • The students of tomorrow

    The students of tomorrow

    By Rikiichi Koizumi – The growth of ICT such as the Internet has been accelerating the globalisation of societies in recent years. In cyberspace, there are no national, temporal or geographical borders. ‘Digital natives’, who were born at a time when the Internet was commonplace, live in two different societies: the ‘real society’ and the ‘virtual society’. Living in such an environment is perfectly normal and natural for them. However, for ‘digital immigrants’ like those of my generation, this two-tiered […]

    Continue reading »

  •  
  • How Open Data, data literacy and Linked Data will revolutionise higher education

    By Derek McAuley, Hanif Rahemtulla, James Goulding and Catherine Souch – ‘Open Data’ refers to the philosophical and methodological approach to democratising data, enabling individuals, communities and organisations to access and create value through the reuse of non-sensitive, publicly available information. This data is typically available online at no cost to citizen groups, non-governmental-organisations (NGOs) and businesses. Some view this as the logical conclusion to Freedom of Information (FoI) Acts in various countries—if citizens can ask for the data, why […]

    Continue reading »

  • The future of university rankings

    By Phil Baty – Let us be frank. University rankings are crude. They simply cannot capture—let alone accurately measure—many of the things that matter most in higher education: how a great lecturer can transform the lives of their students for example, or how much free enquiry enhances our society. They can never be objective, because their indicators and methodologies are based on the subjective judgment of the compilers. At their worst, university rankings can impose uniformity on a sector that […]

    Continue reading »

  • Know-That, Know-How and Know-Why: The Unity of Knowledge

    Know-That, Know-How and Know-Why: The Unity of Knowledge

    By Brian Mooney – While there are ever new issues in addressing the future of education, there are some dimensions of education that remain perennial. While debates rage over whether a university (or even pre-tertiary) education ought to be liberal or foster growth in a globalised economy perhaps we should step back in order to re-focus on what all education involves.  In a recent book I proposed a tripartite distinction in respect to understanding teaching and learning. 1 I argued […]

    Continue reading »

  •