Home » Editions » 2012 UK (Page 2)

  • Higher humanities education in the 21st Century

    By AC Grayling –  There will always be a significant need for higher education to produce the technical and vocational experts whos presence is essential in advanced economies. Scientists, engineers, doctors and lawyers are indispensable, so universities will always train such professionals because there will always be the resources for training them. The necessary funding either comes from individuals themselves who are confident of the return on investment involved (as in the US), or by taxpayers who are similarly (if indirectly) confident, as is still the […]

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  • Putting students first

    By David Willetts –  Across the world, more people aspire to higher education. It is a growth sector in mature economies and developing countries. The evidence on the benefits of higher  education is overwhelming: it is good for individuals, good for the economy and good for society. That list helps answer the question of how to pay for it. It has to be a mixed model in which the direct beneficiaries contribute but others do too. Here in the UK the Dearing report and […]

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  • De Montfort University’s Square Mile Project: the university as a local public good

    By Dominic Shellard and John Craig –  Across all of the UK’s public services, there is a growing movement towards greater engagement with the communities they serve. To some extent, this is happening in response to challenges such as funding cuts, increased competition, and from a national reassessment of their economic and social role. To some extent, it is happening because many public services are fundamentally seeing themselves differently – as more open, and more collaborative than they have been traditionally. In the past, engagement […]

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  • Bursting bubbles in higher education

    By Mark Leach – In higher education, policy bubbles are commonplace. They float around the sector drawing disproportionate levels of interest and as they grow, they become less rooted in evidence, research or coherent thought. It is important to understand these bubbles if we are to improve policy-making in higher education, a project that has never been more important. Shortly after tulips found their way across Europe in the 17th century, their exotic and beautiful qualities quickly made them a […]

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  • Education: from a public value to a positional good

    By John Holmwood –  British higher education is entering into a period of severe disruption brought about by the government’s recent policies for higher education. These are designed to increase private investment in the sector and make it more attractive to for-profit activities, including degree provision and cooperation between existing education institutions and for-profit partners. In fact, a significant increase in private investment will come from the increased student fees that are designed to replace direct public funding via the block teaching grant from the funding […]

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  • Degree classification for the 21st Century

    By Carl Gilleard –  A university education is greater than the sum of its parts: not just a series of course options, but a challenge to think about the connections between these elements; not merely a chance to make friends for life, but an opportunity to work alongside peers in teams that thrive on diversity; a time for indulging one’s thirst for knowledge and preparing for a fulfilling career. The UK Honours degree is a robust qualification which garners worldwide respect; however, we are betraying […]

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  • A private education in times of austerity?

    By Carl Lygo –  We are seeing a tremendous demand for quality university education worldwide but a serious lack of global supply, just as new technologies are improving access to such quality education. In 2000 it was estimated that globally there were 97.3 million students in higher education; by 2012 this had reached over 150 million and some predictions suggest there will be as many as 300 million students by 20251. It is amazing to think that by 2020, four countries will account for over 50% […]

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  • Onwards and upwards: the benefits of part-time study

    Onwards and upwards: the benefits of part-time study

    By Claire Callender and David Wilkinson –  In 2008, 31% of the UK workforce had a Level 4 qualification or above, placing the UK in 12th position in international rankings (UKCES, 2010). To improve the UK’s competitiveness and its economic strength, this proportion needs to increase and the workforces’ skill levels raised. Part-time higher education (HE) study has a particularly significant role to play now and in the future in raising, updating, and improving the skill levels of people already in employment, ensuring they possess […]

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  • Academics and standards: avoiding market failure

    By Andrew McGettigan – Can academic standards be ensured without a central role for academics? Not according to the current regulations governing Degree Awarding Powers.1 Proposals to amend these rules so as to allow for more diversity amongst providers put quality at risk. The government’s reforms of the higher education (HE) sector in England, if allowed to proceed in their current ‘direction of travel’, will exacerbate the disparities already seen between institutions. Resources will increasingly gravitate towards the small group of universities […]

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